Cooking with Alison

Four Different Sauces for Mushroom Ravioli

In Pasta, Rice, and Doughs, Sides and Sauces on May 27, 2010 at pm

I made ravioli from scratch for the first time (recipe here).  For the filling, I used porcini, chanterelle, and lobster mushrooms with ricotta, parmesan and goat cheese.  I wanted to make a sauce that would pair well with mushroom ravioli, but there were so many suitable (and delicious) options, that I couldn’t pick just one or two.  So, I made 4 different sauces.  They are all easy to make and range from simple and comforting to sophisticated and fancy.

Mushroom Ravioli Sauce Pairing #1 is a comforting and hearty tomato sauce.  It is the simplest of the 4 recipes.  The tomato contrasts the creamy mushroom filling nicely.

Mushroom Ravioli Sauce Pairing #2 is a rose sauce.  It is the only cream based sauce and it’s fun to make because it involves setting vodka on fire.  This sauce is very similar to the sauce that I make for my vodka penne (recipe here).

Mushroom Ravioli Sauce Pairing #3 is a white wine and butter sauce that goes really well with the mushrooms.  I like to serve this sauce over giant raviolis.

Mushroom Ravioli Sauce Pairing #4 is one of the simplest, yet the fanciest sauce that I’ve paired with mushroom ravioli.  If only I could afford white truffles to go with this, because that’s how they serve it in some parts of Italy.  I like to serve this browned butter over giant raviolis.

Photo above:  Giant raviolis in White Wine Sauce

Tomato Sauce for Mushroom Ravioli

mushroom ravioli (store bought or made from scratch, recipe here)

1/2 cup tomato based pasta sauce per serving (I used store bought)

1 tbsp whipping cream per 1/2 cup of tomato sauce used (optional)

grated parmesan cheese (I use a Microplane coarse grater)

freshly cracked black pepper

parsley for garnish (optional)

Cook the mushroom ravioli in a large pot of boiling, salted water until the pasta is tender and the filling is hot.  Meanwhile, heat the tomato sauce in a covered sauce pot over medium heat, stirring occasionally.  Use a slotted spoon (I use a Chinese wire strainer) to remove the ravioli from the water and drain well.  Gently stir the whipping cream into the tomato sauce and toss the ravioli in the sauce.  Plate the pasta, add some freshly cracked black pepper, top with some grated parmesan cheese and garnish with parsley (if using).  Serve hot.

Photo above:  Standard sized ravioli in Tomato Sauce

Vodka Cream Sauce for Mushroom Ravioli

makes sauce for 3 to 4 servings

mushroom ravioli (store bought or made from scratch, recipe here)

1 cup whipping cream

1/4 cup vodka

4 tbsp tomato based pasta sauce

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 tbsp olive oil

salt and ground black pepper

grated parmesan cheese (I use a Microplane coarse grater)

fresh parsley or basil for garnish (optional)

Cook the mushroom ravioli in a large pot of boiling, salted water until the pasta is tender and the filling is hot.  Meanwhile, over medium heat, heat 1 tbsp olive oil in a large saute pan.  Add the garlic and cook for 30 seconds to 1 minute.  Add the vodka.  Very carefully, using a lit match, tilt the pan slightly and light the vodka on fire at the very edge of the pan keeping your hands as far away from the pan as possible.  Be very careful, as the flames spread immediately and come up quite high.  Holding the handle of the pan, shake the pan gently back and forth until all of the vodka is burnt off and the fire goes out by itself.  Be careful not to spill any of the vodka from the pan.  Then add the cream and simmer for 1 minute.  Stir in the tomato sauce and salt and pepper to taste.  Once the sauce is heated through, toss with the strained ravioli.  Plate the pasta, top with some grated parmesan cheese and garnish with parsley or basil if using.  Serve hot.

White Wine Sauce for Mushroom Ravioli

makes sauce for 3 to 4 servings

mushroom ravioli (store bought or made from scratch, recipe here)

1 1/2 cups chicken broth (or sodium reduced chicken broth)

3/4 cup dry white wine

2 tbsp + 3 tbsp unsalted butter

1 shallot, finely minced

2 garlic cloves, finely minced

1/2 tsp dried tarragon (or 1 tsp fresh parsley, chopped)

olive oil

salt

ground white pepper

white truffle oil (optional)

Cook the mushroom ravioli in a large pot of boiling, salted water until the pasta is tender and the filling is hot.  Meanwhile, in a saucepan, melt 2 tbsp of butter with a drizzle of olive oil over medium heat.  Add the diced shallots and cook, stirring frequently, for 30 seconds to 1 minute.  Then add the garlic and the chopped fresh parsley if using.  Add a pinch of white pepper and once the garlic is aromatic and softened, about 30 seconds, add the white wine.  Bring the liquid to a boil and reduce the heat to maintain a simmer until the liquid is reduced to about 1/2, about 7 minutes.  (I like to reduce the sauce until I have more than half of the liquid left.)  Add the chicken broth and dried tarragon if using and increase the heat back to medium.  Bring to a boil, reduce the heat again, and simmer until the liquid is reduced by about 1/2, about 7 minutes.  Add 3 tbsp of butter and mix in well.  Remove the sauce from the heat and adjust salt and white pepper to taste.  Plate the strained ravioli, pour the sauce over the ravioli and drizzle with white truffle oil if using.  Serve hot.

Photo above:  Giant ravioli in Browned Butter Sauce

Browned Butter Sauce for Mushroom Ravioli

makes sauce for 3 to 4 servings

mushroom ravioli (store bought or made from scratch, recipe here)

1 stick unsalted butter

small bunch of fresh sage leaves (optional)

white truffle shavings (optional)

Cook the mushroom ravioli in a large pot of boiling, salted water until the pasta is tender and the filling is hot.  Meanwhile, in a heavy bottomed sauce pan, melt the butter over medium heat.  Swirl it frequently until the milk solids brown and give off a nutty aroma.  Remove from heat and throw in a few sage leaves if using.  While still hot, pour the sauce over strained ravioli and top with white truffle shavings if using.  Serve immediately.

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  1. disappointed to see you use store-bought sauce and then add cream!
    Not very authentic or healthy, I should think.

    • I feel guilty every time I use store bought tomato sauce :) I always make my cream sauces from scratch, but since I don’t have a garden [yet], I find it a bit expensive to make tomato sauce from scratch.

      And yes, I agree, adding cream isn’t very good for you, but I usually eat very healthily and I have a very balanced lifestyle, so I don’t believe in counting calories or feeling guilty for indulging every now and then :) Thanks for commenting!

  2. Thanks a million for this, I appreciate the info

  3. Wow, Alison… A month ago I bought some hand-made porcini mushroom ravioli and last night I was searching for the perfect sauce that would bring out the flavor without being to heavy or overpowering. Your white wine sauce was PERFECT! So flavorful, yet not overpowering at all. It really brought out the taste of the mushrooms.
    Thank you so much!
    I have already copied it into my recipe book of favorites.

    Cheers, Kristin~

  4. Hehe, don’t worry Alison! We all use store bought sauce SOMETIMES. We are NOT michelin star chefs. These recipes are fantastic, I am not brave enough to try the Vodka cream sauce…the idea of lighting vodka on fire makes me tremble- but I will try one day!

    • Hi Alexandra! I completely agree! Setting anything on fire in my kitchen makes me (and my guests) nervous too :) But once you get the hang of it, it opens up the door to all sorts of delicious things! ie. saganaki, flambe bananas, and best of all, crepes suzette!!! If you do decide to try a vodka sauce, I highly recommend the vodka penne with prosciutto recipe here:

      http://cookingwithalison.com/2010/02/13/vodka-penne/

      Thank you so much for your comment :)

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  6. The buttered brown sauce was delicious and complimented the mushroom ravioli. Who knew that something so simple would have such a different taste. Thank you

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